Blog

2016-10-14 DLfM 2016 Report

By David Lewis

The Digital Libraries for Musicology (DLfM) workshop was started in 2014 by Kevin Page and Ben Fields. It provides a place to talk about digital library systems specialised for musical and musicological materials. It has run for three years now, with procedings published by the Association of Computing Machinery's International Conference Proceedings Series (ACM-ICPS).

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2016-09-20 DHOxSS 2016 Report

By Richard Lewis

Following the success of last year's Digital Musicology workshop at the Digital Humanities @ Oxford Summer School, we were very pleased to have the workshop accepted again for 2016. The workshop is the perfect platform for bringing together the ideas we've been investigating during Transforming Musicology and explore them with the wider musicology community.

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2016-05-17 15:45 From lutetab to frettab

By Richard Lewis

One of the data sources we're working with on Transforming Musicology is Tim's corpus of encoded lute music sources. In order to prepare this for use with some more contemporary toolchains for dealing with digitised music notation, we've previously worked on extended the Music Encoding Initiative (MEI) schema to allow for lute tablature. We wrote about this is a previous post and also presented our work at the Music Encoding Conference (MEC) last year.

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2016-04-12 14:30 Musical Scholarship and the Future of Academic Publishing

By Richard Lewis

A couple of months ago Marilyn Deegan, who is emeritus professor at King's College London, approached Tim asking him to put together a workshop as part of their Academic Book of the Future project (2014-2016, PI: Samantha Rayner). The project is a partnership between King's and the UCL Centre for Publishing, and is funded by the British Library and the AHRC. The project has included a lot of work with practising scholars but Marilyn was keen to engage the musical community so we accepted her invitation.

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2015-11-27 14:30 Addressing the Music Information Needs of Musicologists

By Richard Lewis

As a research project progresses it's quite common to get the point where you feel ready to explain rather than just report your findings. This is the point where you're ready to give a tutorial. The ISMIR (International Society for Music Information Retrieval) conference has run a tutorials track for several years and many of the topics in MIR which have been the subject of research eventually solidify into practical techniques which can be presented in this tutorial format. ISMIR tutorials are three hours long and often presented by just a small number of people.

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2015-10-19 17:15 Digital Approaches to Early Music and Linked Music Hackathon

By Richard Lewis

Our partners at OeRC have recently been running a couple of mini-projects under the Semantic Media Network grant: Semantic Linking and Integration of Content, Knowledge and Metadata in Early Music (SLICKMEM) and Semantic Linking of BBC Radio (SLoBR). Both projects have a strong Linked Data remit, publishing a significant amount of new Linked Data to the Web. As they were drawing to a close, Kevin Page was keen to close them with a hack day at which the developer community could experiment with the data sources the projects have generated and enhanced.

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2015-05-26 13:15 Large-scale corpus analysis of historical electronic music

By Nick Collins

We're in the later stages of our Transforming Musicology mini-project, and audio CDs have been gathering around us. Though we have 1000 pieces in our database, we still have quite a number to rip and catalogue, a task that is inevitably going to lead through the summer. We're seeking a strong cross-section of historical electronic music works, and though our holdings in later synth pop and electronic dance music also need to be well rounded, the biggest challenge is surveying earlier works, cross referencing electronic music history textbooks, and seeking out early recordings in an appropriate format. We do want to make sure there are good international holdings, and good representation of female composers, though the institutional male European/North American composer has a certain unfortunate foothold in this area.

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2015-05-06 13:30 Setting Up Audio Search Tools

By Richard Lewis

One of our particular areas of interest in computational musicology here at Goldsmiths is audio search: building a database of music recordings and being able to search in that database using audio queries.

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2015-04-09 17:00 Similarity: haven't we heard this before somewhere?

By Alan Marsden

When interviewed by a panel of the Arts and Humanities Research Council as part of the process of securing the funding for Transforming Musicology, we were asked to explain how the project would be unified, rather than a loose collection of three or more separate research projects. Tim gave an excellent presentation which focused on linking themes, and especially on Linked Data, and one of our claims was that, fundamentally, all of the projects would be concerned with using technology to better investigate whether and how one musical thing was like another. Indeed we made a bold claim that much of musicology is concerned with similarity: two pieces of tonal music are like each other because both are elaborations of the same Ursatz; a work of uncertain authorship is demonstrated to be like a set of others and so probably by the same composer; a passage of guitar music is shown to be, in some sense, 'like' a hummingbird.

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2015-03-16 13:30 Medieval Music, Big Data and the Research Blend

By Gregorio Bevilacqua

With the Transforming Musicology mini-project Medieval Music, Big Data and the Research Blend we attempt to address the question of the function of the conductus, a corpus of almost 900 thirteenth-century Latin poems variably set to monophonic and polyphonic music – a repertory that does not seem to have a clear place in the medieval liturgy. Although the themes are mostly devotional, the texts set to music cover a wide range of topics. The known manuscript sources of the conductus (i.e. organised collections of music and poetry) do not provide much information about the significance and scope of the genre.

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2015-01-15 15:15 Thrash Metal, Wiki Data, and The Problem of Web Scraping

By Justin Gagen

So I was looking at a list of thrash metal bands the other day, like you do, and the first entry caused me an immediate problem.

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2014-11-17 11:30 Does Wagner do your head in?

By Tim Crawford

The Transforming Musicology team was in much evidence at last week's performances of Richard Wagner's Ring Cycle at the Birmingham Hippodrome (5-9 November). With the invaluable support of the Hippodrome, we have been able to capture physical data from at least seven participants for each opera, six of whom valiantly attended all four operas - a total of some 15 hours! Seated together in excellent seats in row K, they were able to enjoy the full operatic experience, which, to judge by their comments we heard in the intervals and after each show, was pretty intense. The Shimmer3 devices each wore on a wrist seem to have performed perfectly, and don't seem to have become uncomfortable, even over the two-hour stretches of the longest acts. These measured three basic types of data: galvanic skin response (GSR), heart rate (HR), and their micro-movements in three dimensions.

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2014-09-30 14:30 Introducing Wagnerism

By David Baker

If Richard Wagner were to have known before he died that some scientists in the future would create a psychometric tool to measure the "Wagnerism" in a given individual, would he be flattered or appalled? It's a strange question, but it's a question you could ask since that's what we have been working on here on the Transforming Musicology project.

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2014-06-09 16:15 Project-level Linked Data

By Richard Lewis

The Semantic Web underpins a lot of the technology we are exploring in Transforming Musicology, particularly in its more pragmatic Linked Data incarnation. This technology relies on authorities publishing conformant, linkable data in their knowledge domains.

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2014-05-21 19:20 Customising MEI for lute tablature

By Richard Lewis

The Goldsmiths Computing team of Transforming Musicology holds a good deal of collected wisdom—and data—on encoding tablature sources for the lute. The ECOLM project (An Electronic Corpus of Lute Music) has so far enjoyed three phases of development during which an encoding method for lute tablature, TabCode, has been devised, a large corpus of sources has been encoded, and experiments have been carried out using optical music recognition and crowd-sourced corrections.

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2014-05-19 11:15 Listening for Leitmotives in Wagner

By David Baker

It's hard to hear anything mentioned about the music of Richard Wagner without also hearing someone mention the word 'leitmotif'. Leitmotifs, if you are unfamiliar with the term, are small, dynamic musical ideas that are associated with a person, place, idea, or feeling. These leitmotifs undergo many different transformations throughout Wagner's operas and most importantly, contribute to the dramatic narrative. While this may be common knowledge to most musicologists, how different groups of people actually experience these leitmotifs has remained very unexplored in much of the academic literature.

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2014-05-07 16:45 Marking up opera

By Richard Lewis

One of Transforming Musicology's core musicological work packages addresses the leitmotive technique of Richard Wagner. In this work we are applying a mixed disciplines approach comprising: humanistic literature study of the ways the leitmotives have been identified and discussed since the operas' first performances up to the present; computational audio similarity experiments to find known leitmotives and potential leitmotive candidates; and pyschological listening tests of participants with a range of Wagner experience to understand how they hear the operas and the leitmotives.

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2014-04-07 17:22 EMO catalogue and images: Where to go from here (part 1)

By David Lewis

Tim has already discussed in a blog entry some of the treatment of our efforts to take the data provided by EMO, the Early Music Online project. In that post, Tim considers some of the issues relating to transcribing and comparing the musical content of the EMO images.

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2014-02-14 17:30 Mini-projects networking meeting

By Richard Lewis

On Wednesday we held our networking meeting for those who have expressed an interest in applying for one of the Transforming Musicology mini-projects. It was hosted at the Lancaster Institute for Contemporary Arts (part of the University of Lancaster) by Alan Marsden, a co-investigator on the project and responsible for the mini-projects component. As well as Alan, Tim Crawford, Christophe Rhodes, Kevin Page, Ben Fields, and I were all present representing the project team.

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2013-12-03 15:30 Exploring musical data sources

By Richard Lewis

One of the key requirements for our social music analysis widget will be access to a large collection of music data. Such a requirement begs a number of important questions:

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2013-11-22 15:15 EMO work-alignment using musical content

By Tim Crawford

Use the musical content recognised by Aruspix as a means of confirming the identity (or close similarity - another discussion ...) of works against both the internal collection (items already in EMO) and external resources such as the RISM OPAC.

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2013-10-31 16:00 Collaborating with PRAISE project

By Richard Lewis

While discussing the social music analysis widget idea, Christophe Rhodes suggested talking to another research project which is currently underway with Goldsmiths as the lead technical partner, PRAISE (Practice and peRformance Analysis Inspiring Social Education).

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2013-10-18 15:00 Social Music Analysis Widget

By Richard Lewis

The Transforming Musicology project includes three musicological work packages intended as case studies to demonstrate how music information retrieval and related technologies may be applied in musicological research. These are complemented by four technical work packages in which an infrastructure for supporting computational musicology will be developed drawing on a lot of existing technology.

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2013-10-15 11:00 Starting Up

By Richard Lewis

The Transforming Musicology project officially started on 1 October.

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